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$3m: That's The Value Of Ads In This Paper (ST)

BackMay 28, 2011

TODAY'S edition of The Straits Times (ST) has hit a new record for advertising revenue.

Revenue from display advertisements in the 172 pages of ST and Life! today, excluding the Classifieds section, is slightly more than $3 million.

The previous record was $2.58 million on a Saturday in 2000.

The biggest advertiser in today's paper is Resorts World Sentosa, which took out five consecutive full-page ads and a wraparound ad, altogether costing more than $500,000, to celebrate the grand opening of Universal Studios Singapore. Regular advertisers who placed large ads in today's paper include Courts Singapore, SingTel, StarHub and Far East Group.

Mr Leslie Fong, senior executive vice-president of Singapore Press Holdings' (SPH) marketing division, said the record revenue showed advertisers' confidence in the newspaper's 'reach, efficacy and ability to innovate and deliver creative solutions for their marketing needs'.

'We've always maintained that print is a potent platform and, voila, our advertisers agree with us,' he said.

Ms Elsie Chua, executive vice-president of SPH marketing and head of display ads, said: 'The Straits Times prevails as the best marketing platform that delivers reach, response and results for advertisers.'

Today's bumper edition - a 286-page paper in 11 parts - also meant ST's editorial team had to work towards three different deadlines for the first time yesterday.

The first half of Life! went to print at 1pm, after which the remaining 24 pages went to print at 7pm together with the 26-page Saturday Special Report. The main section of ST - 100 pages - went to print at 11.30pm.

The staggered print times were to accommodate the larger number of pages.

ST editor Han Fook Kwang said the record revenue was part of a 'virtuous circle' for the newspaper.

'When we produce a paper that's the best read in Singapore, we become very attractive for advertisers. This in turn will give us the resources to make the paper even better for our readers,' he said. 'That's been the winning formula for The Straits Times these 166 years.'