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SPH gives $200,000 in support of the elderly - Aug 06, 2008 (BT)

BackAug 06, 2008

The Straits Times / The Business Times News On SPH

SPH gives $200,000 in support of the elderly

Community Chest chairman Jennie Chua expressed her appreciation to SPH for its continuing partnership in supporting critical social service programmes.

By Arthur Lee
Aug 06, 2008
The Business Times

BY the year 2050, Singapore is projected to have the world's fourth-oldest population. And as early as 2030, one in five people here will be aged over 65, according to a recent Ministerial Committee report on Ageing.

SPH chairman Tony Tan said yesterday this means Singapore faces the twin challenges of providing affordable healthcare and eldercare services to promote active ageing.

Helping hand: Dr Tan says Singapore faces the twin challenges of providing affordable healthcare and eldercare services to promote active ageing

The elderly should continue to live in their own homes as part of family and community, so that they can enjoy the company of loved ones, he said.

Dr Tan was speaking at the presentation of $200,000 to 20 charitable organisations serving the elderly, at the fifth annual SPH Group Giving, held at the News Centre auditorium.

The donations will help fund nursing-care programmes for the needy elderly in their own homes, and eldercare services. Some of the programmes provide daycare, home nursing and meal deliveries so that the elderly can continue to live in the comfort of their own home. Others offer a homely environment for those who do not have alternative accommodation or caregivers.

Community Chest chairman Jennie Chua expressed her appreciation to SPH for its continuing partnership in supporting critical social service programmes that help elderly people live better lives.

She said that in these inflationary times, it may be appropriate to do more for families at risk, especially those affected by rising prices. Unlike the more visible needy, these families' needs may not be visible.

She suggested that ways be found to reach them, and that after they are reached, some financial help be provided without making them feel they are useless and unable to take care of themselves.