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BT sees readership rise, ST remains top paper - Oct 17, 2008 (BT)

BackOct 17, 2008

The Straits Times / The Business Times News On SPH

BT sees readership rise, ST remains top paper

The Straits Times is read by 63 per cent of professionals, managers, executives and businessmen, who also make up 78 per cent of BT's reader base.

By Teh Shi Ning
Oct 17, 2008
The Business Times

THE Business Times saw its readership shoot up last year, according to the 2008 Nielsen Media Index.

Some 4,717 people here aged 15 and over were surveyed and, based on the sample, BT's daily readership rose to 108,000 - from 86,000 the previous year. This came as no surprise as BT's circulation is hitting all-time highs, with average daily sales touching 34,000 copies for the financial year ended Aug 31, 2008.

The Nielsen study found that for 75 per cent of people, traditional hard-copy newspapers are still a prime source of news. Readership of English dailies, excluding the bilingual My Paper, came to 50 per cent, the same as last year.

The Straits Times is the leading newspaper, with a daily readership of 39 per cent. BT upped its readership to 3 per cent from last year's 2 per cent, while readership of The New Paper slipped to 13 per cent, from last year's 15 per cent.

The survey showed that The Straits Times is read by 63 per cent of professionals, managers, executives and businessmen, who also make up 78 per cent of BT's reader base.

Readership of Chinese dailies slipped two percentage points to 30 per cent. Lianhe Zaobao is still on top with 15 per cent readership, down from 17 per cent last year.

Use of the Internet has risen - almost six out of 10 people are considered average daily users. 'The Internet has become an essential space for traditional news media to leverage,' said Rebecca Tan, executive director for Nielsen Media Research.

Terrestrial television remains a key media choice, although viewership fell five percentage points from last year to 78 per cent. Cable television's past week viewership rose to 49 per cent, and about half of the population has access to cable. 'Cable television and the newly introduced paid Internet TV offerings have affected TV viewing with their niche content and flexible viewing options,' said Ms Tan.